Sunday, 2 July 2017

A Culinary Experiment.




We have LOADS of these small semi-wild Plums. They taste very good, and have one great advantage over our other Plums; they never ever have worms inside!

Being a huge fan of Japanese Umeboshi, I thought I'd have a go at making my own version of Pickled Plums.


The Plums were cooked in equal amounts of red wine Vinegar and Sugar until just softening. I added some Salt, Peppercorns, and Chilli flakes; then straight into the bottle. 


I'll leave them for a week or so before tasting.

I'm not over-confident about them, but if they are even reasonably tasty I shall see them as a success. With so many Plums otherwise going to waste, one can but experiment.

The weather's been so foul here recently, that there really hasn't been much else to do.



25 comments:

  1. That sounds really delicious. I'll bet pickled plums would be wonderful with a pork roast!

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    Replies
    1. I haven't tried them yet; I'll let you know.

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  2. They must ripen much earlier than the plums we have in the garden, ours are still green!

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    1. I have 3 of these Plum trees. One is already ripe, the other two not at all. Our pukka Plums are still green, like yours. These ones make great Plum sauce.

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  3. I love umeboshi ! I have a very small Korean market near me that stocks the brand I like. I love plums.
    Family and friends always know to send me some from Japan when friends come to visit.
    Can not wait to hear if you like them. There are so many family recipes much like kim chee.

    cheers, parsnip andthehamish

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    Replies
    1. We had a Japanese visitor, many years ago, who introduced me to Umeboshi. I was addicted instantly. Not something one can find here, sadly.

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    2. Best breakfast is rice, some fish and several umeboshi. Heaven

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  4. I had not heard of them but thanks to Mr. Google I see that they are soaked in salt baths and sun dried and VERY EXPENSIVE $23,00 for 150 grams. I think I will pass on them.

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    Replies
    1. The ones above are not pukka Umeboshi, they are just pickled Plums. However, I do also have some that are salting, and will eventually be sun dried. But not being the right sort of Plum, I have no idea how they'll turn-out.

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  5. We had a bullace tree in a hedge on the farm. It was the first to flower and the first to bear fruit each year.

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    Replies
    1. I think ours are Cherry Plums, or something similar. They are picked by the handful, and make a very good Plum Sauce.

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  6. I have to Google a lot after reading this post, but i like it anyway, i am always happy to learn new things.

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    Replies
    1. Real Japanese Umeboshi are delicious, but probably as difficult to find in Israel as they are here.

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  7. Pickled plums sound delish. I am impressed once again. Good eating

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    Replies
    1. I was going to taste one about an hour ago, but I couldn't get the top off!

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  8. I really admire the way you attempt your culinary experiments Cro - you seem to eat simply yet tastily all of the time. Do you still paint?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, still painting. I fit a lot into my days.

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  9. My friend makes sweet, spicy bottled sauces from those little bitter plums.

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    Replies
    1. Star Anise is an important ingredient.

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    2. Sounds good; I'll give it a go.

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  10. I've never heard of umeboshi, but we are decidedly non-multi-cultural (is that a term?) around here, our stores only carry the predictable. Do you eat these plums like a savory side to meat? -Jenn

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    Replies
    1. I'm hoping so. With cold meats and salad perhaps?

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  11. I cant abide plums
    They give me the runs

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  12. As a pickled-most-things lover I'd definitely give them a try.

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