Saturday, 10 December 2016

20 years ago.


I apologise in advance for the quality of these photos; they are photos of photos that I've just found at the back of a cupboard.

It was my, and my life-long friend Michael's, 50th, and we decided to go 'all out'.

I bought a whole Lamb, booked 'Jean' the local expert Lamb roaster, and we invited just about everyone we knew. It was to be a feast not to be forgotten.


Jean had instructed us to light the huge fire (a cubic metre of Oak) at mid-day, then just as Michael and I returned from the vineyard (with several hundred litres of wine), the heavens opened in infernal proportions, and we feared that it would be a total wash-out. As it happened it stayed alight, and Jean arrived at about 4 pm to start the actual cooking.


He turned and basted, and at about 8 pm it was declared cooked, the guests had arrived, and the feast began.

                            

Jean commandeered the help of our frightfully aristocratic chum The Count Malvinski (nearest) to carve the beast, then we all settled down to one of the most delicious meals ever served chez nous (honestly).

We were eating Lamb for the next week or so, but no-one complained. People still speak of the feast today, and we have threatened to do it all again one day. Somehow I don't think we will, but there's no harm in dreaming.


31 comments:

  1. Wow, that sounds great! What other foods were served along with the lamb?

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    1. I think we started with Charcuterie, the Lamb was served with Flageolets beans (small green beans) and salad etc, then cheeses, and a Lemon Meringue Pie. It was a fabulous evening.

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  2. Lamb on the spit is quite common here. It was brought over by the Dalmations when they settled here. I was looking at a Facebook post a few minutes ago of one a friend had put on a couple of weeks ago.

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    1. Unfortunately Jean is no longer with us, so we'd either have to do it our-selves, or find someone else. Our village roasts about 6 every summer for our annual fete.

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  3. What a fabulous celebration - just think of all the mint sauce you would need - a bucketful, at least :)

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    1. That's what I made; almost a bath-full.

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  4. Cro, you missed a wonderful opportunity when you had your 70th birthday in the summer. Never mind, you've plenty of time to plan the next big one.

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    1. We did talk about it, but I couldn't persuade them.... too many veggies around.

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    2. I often wonder if all these " veggies" realise that if everyone was persuaded to stop eating meat ( it will never happen) there would be no cute , furry animals in the fields not to eat..if you get my gist!

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    3. Most of the veggies I know would probably replace the animals with wind or solar farms. Horrible.

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  5. Spit roast lamb cooked to perfection in the French style and carved by a count...what a way to celebrate. We do it every Easter but the greek way.

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    1. The count was a Russian count, and that doesn't count.

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  6. Looks magnificent Cro. It's my 60th birthday today, how did that happen? Planning a big event in Spring to celebrate with my best chum who also turns 60 in February. I'll let you know how it goes :)

    Jean

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    1. Well, very happy birthday Jean. Will you be roasting some huge beast?

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  7. Philippe did one of these for his 50th birthday. The party started at midday and finished in the early hours. He's 60 this summer. I'm not sure I could keep up.

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    1. Did he roast it himself? Maybe I could hire him for an evening!

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  8. Roast pigs are the norm for special events around here. Fatted piglet, half a 40 gallon drum, fire, and wine.

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    1. Here it's nearly always a Lamb; and is known as a Méchoui.

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  9. We have pigs here only in small parts,and if i want to have some i must look for the "Russian" shops here.

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    1. Spit roasted Pork is delicious.... but in Israel? I thought such things were forbidden!

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  10. I did the same with a whole deer once. The spit was made from scaffolding and it was basted (for hours) with blocks of lard, straight out of the paper. As you may tell, I am no longer vegetarian.

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    1. If I could get my hands on a whole Deer I'd love to do that too. Lambs are the norm here.

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  11. It's hard for me (a tree hugger) to see the lamb, but I do enjoy that it was prepared with a festive spirit and fed many.

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    1. We're Lamb-eating tree huggers Amy, set in our ways.

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  12. Here, a pig roast is the way to have a large gathering. People can rent a roaster and it will be brought to your home, complete with skewered pig. We even had a pig roast at our highschool graduation party (many years ago). Your party sounds like it was memorable! -Jenn

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    1. That sounds perfect; a mobile feast. Pity someone around here doesn't start up a similar service.

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  13. I agree about repeating it again Cro - never the same second time round (and that goes for everything) - best left with those memories.

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    1. I think you're probably right. Trying to re-create an event is never a good idea.

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  14. Looks sumptuous, even to a vegetarian. We are spoiled in SA as lamb or pig on the spit is quite often done, especially for special occasions like the one you celebrated.

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    1. Maybe I should move. I like the sound of SA; I have friends there too.

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