Saturday, 22 October 2016

Paté v Rillettes.


                                   Afficher l'image d'origine

Everyone knows about Paté, but do you know about its big cousin 'Rillettes'? I shall try to explain the difference.

Paté is made from coarsely ground raw Pork, with the addition of herbs, etc. This is put into jars/cans/dishes and sterilised or cooked. Rillettes is made from either Pork, Duck, or Goose (or a mixture), which has been slow cooked in stock, allowed to cool, then the meat pulled apart and semi-mashed. This meat is then mixed with fat (from the same animal type), and stored under a further layer of fat. It is not really designed to last too long, unless potted like the jar above.

Additions, and seasonings, in both cases depend on the maker.

Here in France we eat a lot of both Paté and Rillettes. Both are fatty, and should be eaten in small quantities.

We've just recently consumed a jar of the Goose Rillettes (above), made in nearby Cahors. In my humble opinion, it is one of the most delicious things on earth, and eaten with good freshly baked Sourdough bread, must be the zenith of French charcuterie.

If you are lucky enough to find a jar of Mémé Quercy's Rillettes d'Oie in a store near you, buy one. It's not cheap, but you'll not regret it. It is not to be compared to the inferior northern Pork Rillettes du Mans, that one finds in all French supermarkets.

Good Paté is good; good Rillettes is sensational.





38 comments:

  1. I agree with you Cro....especially with the fresh, sourdough bread. It is wonderful... here, we can get fresh made goose and pork from our butcher... from the two nearby goat's cheese farms, rillettes du chèvre..... from the local duck farm...canard....
    From our local rabbit meat suppliers, mashed bunny meat... and from the Geline du Touraine breeder, chicken rillettes!
    All local, all excellent...and all superior to pâté.....
    I have also found, but sadly not local....a source of beef rillette in Auchan. That is as close as you can get to traditional UK potted beef...excellent stuff, all of them.
    Yes, rillettes are a really good way of having a nutritious, quick lunch. Just add salad from the potager, and hot out of the oven bread!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gosh, you have a far better selection than we do here. I've never heard of Goat, Beef, or Rabbit Rillettes.... I obviously have a lot of tasting to do.

      If it wasn't for its fattiness, it would be on my daily lunchtime menu.

      Delete
  2. Despite being a fan of the French pate, never noticed this alternative. Unless, of course, with my limited French, I've just assumed it's another brand of pate.
    I will be looking out for this next time there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At the Deli counters it does just look like a 'pale' Paté, but try it; I'm sure you'll love it.

      Delete
  3. Have seen it and often wanted to try it. Perhaps I can take a jar home with me next year. Do you think I will find Goose Rillettes in Paris ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure you will, you may even find a jar of Mémé Quercy's. I think there's a specialist S W France shop in Paris.

      Delete
  4. I love pate so will look out for this. At Xmas we get a few unusual items in the shops. Certainly it won't be your superior brand. We get pork preserved in fat which is a Greek way of preserving meat. Hardly the same

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We too have various types of Pork preserved in fat, and of course our Duck preserved in fat (Confit de Canard) is infamous. All these wonderful foods date from times when housewives needed to preserve for winter. Pure genius.

      Delete
  5. We don't eat hardly any paté, and that would be bought from the supermarket. I did make rillettes once from the head of a pig we slaughtered, but did not enjoy eating it because I kept 'seeing' the head floating in the pot! But we have so much meat in the freezers (goat, rabbit, pork, sheep) that I did think about having a go at making rillettes from it to help get it used up. No more cooking of heads though! They are put in the woods for the local wild animals to recycle!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pork cheeks are nice, but I imagine you removed those first. I don't think I'd bother to make Pork Rillettes, the Duck or Goose is far superior.... but I can't see myself ever making my own. The occasional pot Of Mémé's does me fine.

      Delete
  6. Sounds very good. I wonder if it is even better on warm grilled sourdough bread? I have learnt of many new (to me) culinary products on your blog. I'm on my way out to do my weekly shopping this morning and I have just added it to my list. I might not find it in my usual supermarket but there is a larger, and more specialised, one that might have it.
    Greetings Maria x


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy hunting. If you find any, be prepared to put on a bit of weight.

      I like my Rillettes on plain freshly baked bread, the two go together so well.

      Delete
    2. No luck with Rillettes, but it was interesting to stop at the "sauce" shelves; there were plenty Patès: mushroom, truffle, wild game etc. Husband bought wild boar Patè to try.
      X

      Delete
  7. What is the attraction of sourdough bread? Is this a phase or will it take over?
    I regret that I wondered what the veggie form of rillettes was. Would it be Sandwich Spread?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sourdough has always been the bread of choice in France, but nowadays the quicker yeast bread is everywhere. I can't imagine a Vegan version of Rillettes; it sounds almost as bad as Vegan Bacon.

      Delete
    2. tofu scramble made with coconut oil?

      Delete
    3. Don't; I can almost taste it!

      Delete
  8. Scallop rillettes are a favourite that I bring back from Brittany to extend my holiday. Thanks for explaining the difference. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's another one I've never had. It seems as if each region makes its own. Seeing as how I adore Scallops, it sounds pretty good.

      Delete
  9. We've got kilos of rillettes de porc in the freezer from our own pigs. Way too much for two people. I don't enjoy it as much as I used too, would you believe it.
    There is a French charcutier living out here in the sticks and he made us a whole lot of goodies from our pigs. He went a bit crazy with the rillettes.
    I generally make my own paté and always with liver added, which is what we prefer.


    @Potty Sourdough bread is the old way of breadmaking. Yeast bread came much later. In continental Europe sourdough has always been a staple.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I make my own Paté in Winter, usually with a lump of Foie Gras in the middle. I love the whole process, and the eating; of course.

      Delete
    2. Foie Gras, Foie Gras...
      Is there a property for sale next to you ? I promise I'll be the best neighbour ever.

      Delete
    3. I was forgetting that you're in Ireland now; a little more tricky to buy your Foie Gras!

      Delete
  10. Can anything taste better than paté? I'm ashamed to say I've never tried rillettes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When you come back, buy yourself a jar of Mémé Quercy's Rillettes d'Oie, and you'll see what I mean. I shall take no responsibility for faintings, or swoonings.

      Delete
  11. They sell that exact brand here in Waitrose. I bet it costs more here...

    ReplyDelete
  12. May we display your header on our new site directory? As it is now, the site title (linked back to your home page) is listed, and we think displaying the header will attract more attention. In any event, we hope you will come by and see what is going on at SiteHoundSniffs.com.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do what you will Jerry, I always enjoy new visitors. I will certainly pop by your page too. Thanks.

      Delete
    2. Thank you so very much for giving permission. You can see your linked header under All, Daily life and France. If you could say something (preferably good) about SiteHoundSniffs.com here and there, I would greatly appreciate it.

      Delete
  13. It's been ages since I have tasted any sort of pate. Rillettes and I have yet to meet. Another something to add to my list. I'll report back when I have actually tried this new food. It might be a while, but your enthusiasm is contagious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ha... I'm a true foodie at heart.

      Delete
  14. Thank you for explaining the difference. I have often wondered and put off buying Rillettes as a result (shame on me!). Each year there are vast quantities available in the Lot and now I know what to look out for. I will also be heading for Waitrose in the meantime!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, this'll be even more local for you, than for me. Put it on your list of things to buy!

      Delete
  15. I've never been able to develop a taste for rillettes although I do like the smoother pâté providing it's reasonably firm.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is certainly 'smoother', but perhaps not as firm as you'd like. However, the flavour is superb, and it makes a perfect picnic food with some good quality bread.

      Delete
  16. Couldn't agree more. Just love rillettes. I'm also partial to a little pate a tete with a glass of chilled Pineau.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like Paté de Tete too, but Lady Magnon won't touch it. If it was called something else she'd probably love it.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...