Saturday, 15 October 2016

Favourite Bit.



Whether one lives in a tiny apartment, a terraced house, a Georgian vicarage, or a palatial pile, there is usually one part of any property that one particularly likes more than the rest.

In our small home it is definitely our pool's 'pump house'.

It was built about 13 years ago (when we installed the pool), so is relatively young.

The builders simply did the basic block-work, leaving a roofless, doorless, grey lump, with no access down to its interior.  I built the Genoise (the decorative bit between the wall and roof), had the small stone window cut, helped construct the roof's woodwork, did the tiling, rendered the walls, constructed the short wall to the left, built steps down to the entrance, commissioned the two bird finials, installed the urn, and planted all the greenery.


It really has become a delightful little building which gives the pool real purpose. Without it, or with something less attractive, the area would have been a disaster.

Our little 300 year old house has quite a few pleasant features, but somehow this 13 year old one gives me the most pleasure.

It almost has the appearance of an ancient building that has been 'restored'.



31 comments:

  1. It is absolutely delightful and looks like it 'belongs'. You must be up very early this morning?

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    Replies
    1. Always up at 5.30 am; even though I have a stinking cold.

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  2. Fabulous and charming, it is my favorite also.
    When you have all the flowers blooming it is so perfect.

    cheers, parsnip

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    Replies
    1. It really is a little gem; but more by luck than design.

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  3. That's lovely and looks nothing like some of the new build monstrosities that are going up around here. You'd never guess it was just thirteen years old. x

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    Replies
    1. I always to try to make things blend in. Our house was just a one room ruin when I bought it, so it's been fun trying to make all the additions look 'old'.

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  4. Do you need a "council permit" to build there?

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    Replies
    1. For most permanent things, yes. When we built our 'tower', you could build up to 20 square metres footprint without permission, but I believe this has now changed.

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  5. It is precious and binds in well with the rest of its surrounding; I know your caravan will turn out in the same way; camouflaged and mixed in with the greenery! There is a saying in Italian that sounds more or less like this; "who does for he, does for three" - with your good taste and hard work, this is your case.
    Greetings Maria x

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    Replies
    1. The important thing here is that buildings (and caravans) blend in with the environment. Things that don't, stand out like a sore thumb. I know of too many.

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    2. No comment; I've been told I was unkind to him.

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  6. We live in a stone house that has a small brick room built at the end (probably late 1800s). This looks very much okay, but a brick store built mid 20 century looked awful and will pulled it down.
    I love your window.

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    Replies
    1. Some English brick is ghastly, but good hand made brick usually goes with almost anything (as long as they use the right colour mortar).

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  7. Replies
    1. It'd make a nice cottage for the dogs.

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  8. It looks as if it could have been there for hundreds of years and is such a pretty building ..... you are a clever old thing Cro !!!! XXXX

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    Replies
    1. I love it. Every time I look at it, I feel some satisfaction.

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  9. it sits well there,you've done a good job

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    Replies
    1. It blends in well, which was the objective.

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  10. I love it, love it, love it! You are so creative, a true artist, well done!! I too have built a garden from scratch here in Turkey where I now live. I am constantly adding to it. You can read about my life here in my new blog: http://adjustingmyfocusagain.blogspot.com.tr/

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    Replies
    1. I will certainly visit your site. My late father-in-law spent many years in Turkey; originally as a dealer in rare carpets, then as a diplomat. He also spoke Turkish (which helped).

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  11. You have posted many pictures of that lovely structure and it is always a pleasure to view. Hard work paid off wonderfully.

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  12. Indeed, that is exactly what it looks like Cro. Lovely.

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  13. I've loved your little pump house since I first encountered it. I see buildings in the distance, one with a red roof. Terra cotta or tin? I would like either. My neighbor has a red tin roof. I spend too much time gazing at it.

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    Replies
    1. The well hidden one, with the red roof, is the first house I bought here in 1972, the other one to its left is an agricultural building with a corrugated ciment fibre roof.

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  14. It's easy to see why this would be your favorite place. Its creation was certainly a labor of love.

    Best wishes. Hoping your cold moves on soon.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, my cold is just a cold; more annoying than anything. I have things to do.

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  15. Looks very natural in its setting, not something that is easy to achieve.

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