Friday, 30 September 2016

Preparing for the cold.



Winter approaches; time to start thinking of wood.

I think we've now got enough Chestnut (above), and the Oak has been delivered (below). The Chestnut is beautifully dry, and will probably be our main source of heat this Winter. As Oak is twice as expensive, we try to limit its use.


I've bought a new chain for the chainsaw. Each metre length log needs to be sawn into three.

The past few Winters have been relatively mild, and I'm hoping that the trend continues. I don't like the cold, I don't like frost, and I certainly don't like snow. My fingers are crossed.

For delivery in Autumn 2017, I've also bought a big pile of split Red Oak logs, which is still in the woods. These are the Oaks with the fabulous red Autumnal foliage. I'm told that the wood is even better as firewood that the normal Oak. It is certainly very heavy and dense, so I'm looking forward to trying it in the wood-burner; probably in 2018 (if I'm spared).

p.s. I put away my garden sprinkler recently, thinking that we would have some rain. I'm now having to put it all back again. Bloody weather; back above the mid-20's again, and no precipitation!

We're promised some rain for tomorrow (Saturday); we'll see. 




31 comments:

  1. Tomorrow's rain has now been degraded to 'cloudy'; I despair.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I cant see why you want rain.

      Delete
    2. It hasn't rained for months. Apart from anything; we want mushrooms.

      Delete
  2. That is quite a bit of wood. I hope your winter is warm so you will have extra for the following year(s). As lovely as the smell of burning wood in the fireplace is, I love my gas fireplace that gives me instant heat without any work.

    We are having a lovely rain now and it sounds lovely. I hope it comes to you soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think we have enough for two years anyway. I like to keep a good stock at hand.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. That was exactly what I said yesterday.

      Delete
  4. There is something extraordinarily reassuring about having a plentiful supply of logs. Something to do with self sufficiency I suppose. (I wish I'd brought furry slippers to Oz instead of flip flops.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've just been looking at some pictures of Electricity Pylons having blown down in S Oz; makes our wood piles even more comforting.

      Delete
  5. There is a chill in the air here Cro and thought's are turning to when the heating will be switched on ...... I don't like putting it on until at least mid-October !!
    Has the swimming pool been put to bed yet ? XXXX

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We swam yesterday; it was 27 C in the shade and 23 C in the water; Brrrrr. I think it may have been the last swim of the year. I'm like you; no fires before mid-October, or hopefully much later.

      Delete
  6. Those are two wonderful piles of wood. Oak and chestnut. I'll have to ask around here. Our wood is olive. We used pine for a while last year and gummed up the flues. We ordered at the beginning of summer and it still hasn't been delivered.it is from the olive groves of a cousin do it will arrive....sometime.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Burning Olive wood sounds wonderful; harder even than Oak. We never burn Pine, as you say it mucks-up the pipes etc.

      Delete
  7. As the old woodcutters say "Oaken logs, if dry and old, keep away the winter's cold" and Chestnut is good if laid away - so you are definitely going to be warm and toasty with all that wood. It is a sight to gladden the heart.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is indeed. I'm not sure what 'laid away' means, but I presume 'in store'.

      Delete
  8. The joy of a neat and plentiful woodstack I can appreciate. But as tempes has fugitted, I now only have to flick a switch. Bliss. No humping and dumping, sawing and sweeping, lifting and stoking. Just a hefty oil bill.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Flick of the switch heating is very convenient, but I actually enjoy the inconvenience of cutting and hauling wood. It keeps me busy, and I hope healthy.

      Delete
  9. What a lovely big pile of wood, and so reassuring to have in readiness for the next couple of winters. We have ordered oak and ash logs to help build up our next winter's supply, and Lester will cut dead wood from our woodland to help the supplies. No rain here either. Everything looking dried up again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No rain on the horizon at all. They keep promising, but nothing happens.

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Or invite folk for an al fresco meal.

      Delete
  11. Luckily we have enough wood on our land to keep us going. No oak, sadly, but plenty of hawthorn (not a long lived tree), ash, chestnut,holly and the like. It is one of the farmer's jobs during the summer to get large quantities ready for our wood burner - and luckily we have plenty of room in our sheds to store it under cover.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been meaning to build a pukka wood shed for years, but have never got round to it. The Tarpaulins do a reasonably good job.

      Delete
  12. We are having a span of rainy days over here, so perhaps that weather front will eventually get across the Atlantic. It was fun to have a walk today through a steady, yet gentle rain, with boots on my feet and sturdy umbrella overhead. It's about 15 degrees, so it won't be long before radiators begin their steamy hissing.

    Best wishes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We've just had some overnight rain, and I'm hoping it'll continue through the day. AT LAST!

      Delete
  13. I would love to experience four definite seasons like you have. Maybe I wouldn't like it but it sounds good to me. Not likely though as nowhere in UK or Europe will let you stay that long. Pity !

    ReplyDelete
  14. I guess I could try Tasmania ???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I saw a TV programme about Tasmania recently; it looked rather nice. Very quiet and un-populated. Could be worth a visit.

      Delete
  15. We had an hour or two of rain Friday night. Not enough, but a start - filled up the empty rain butt!

    ReplyDelete
  16. You are very wise to keep a stock at hand. Here in Canada the nights are just starting to get a little chilly and we have two cords (a measure that denotes eight feet long, eight feet high and four feet wide) laid in for this winter and next. I do love this time of year, even though I spent the summer splitting rounds by hand! James

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...