Tuesday, 30 August 2016

B...B...B...Bougnette.


Unless you live in the Languedoc area of southern France, you will probably never come across these Bougnettes (pronounced Boon-yet). 


My friend Julie brought these with her recently, and they were consumed last night. They had spent a week in the freezer. 


So, what is a Bougnette

The original recipe involves seasoned belly pork, bread, and eggs, wrapped in crepinette (caul), but variations exist. The ones above seemed to follow the classic recipe perfectly. A peasant dish made to make the most of small amounts of meat. 

They are sliced and fried without the addition of any oil. I think you can almost imagine the flavour just by looking at the photos.


They were consumed accompanied by sautéed potatoes, steamed spinach, and red wine.

Absolutely delicious; a real treat. Thank you Julie.


42 comments:

  1. Looks delicious. The peasants know best when it comes to food. And those accompaniments aren't bad either, especially the glass of red.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right, the best recipes come from the countryside; making the most of what's locally available in each season (including the rouge).

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. A rare treat. A lot of 'calories', but once in a while...

      Delete
  3. That looks tasty.....there is nothing to beat simple country food, and I would have a go at making them if it were not for the fact that our belly of pork makes our bacon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Go on; you could keep a little bit back for making one of these.

      Delete
  4. Looks so good, when it comes to food you can always trust the French.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Those have made me very delicious indeed. Peasant fare - my kind of food! x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too; I don't do 'sophisticated'.

      Delete
  6. It reminds me of fried bread and bacon bits or pork cheese and an egg but made in one lump. I specialise in peasant food..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Almost like a stuffing made with Pork.

      Delete
  7. We'll be in Argeles, which is part of the Langduoc-Roussilon region and Catalan territory, for 2 weeks soon, a place we visit 2-3 times a year.

    Usually indulge in their excellent chorrizzo, cheese and wine, all from local markets.

    Never seen this product, or didn't know what it was, but I'll be looking for it and asking the stall-holders if it's available.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I cant believe it.
    My daily need for scotch eggs is waining

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Probably my fault after yesterday's delightful Scotch egg short cut recommendation

      Delete
    2. I thought John would have fainted after reading about your deconstructed Scotch Eggs.

      Delete
  9. A bit like a French version of a Haggis I suppose.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I very nearly bought some Haggis flavoured crisps this morning.

      Delete
  10. They look lovely Cro ..... simple peasant food is always the best ..... I am partial to a bit of haggis too .... mind you, I'm partial to most things !! XXXX

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I adore Haggis, unfortunately the supply in France is Zero.

      Delete
  11. How nice to have a friend who brings food. She knows you well. Did she also bring the wine?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They did bring some of their local wine, but we are usually very well stocked. Wine is always welcome.

      Delete
  12. Do you promise that they DONT smell or taste like andouillette?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not at all. They smell (if anything) of roast pork. Lovely.

      Delete
  13. What a wonderful meal! I shall have to look up a recipe for those as sure my farmer husband would love. Me too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There must be a recipe somewhere. Mr Donna would love them.

      Delete
  14. Thank you for an introduction to another delicious dish. I will remember the name.

    Best wishes.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Never come across these before. They look a bit wicked.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very naughty; about 2000 calories per mouthful.

      Delete
  16. In Languedoc Roussillon les bougnettes are normally a sort of fines Crêpes craquantes with sugar. The porc bougnettes are coming from the Aveyron department. I hate these bougnettes cause I hate crépinette.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These come from L'Herault. The sweet Bougnettes are more like Beignets.

      Delete
  17. Reminded me of my childhood Cro, when we kept a pig and killed it each year. My Aunt used to come and stay and my mother and she used to completely deal with it over three or four days.
    The caul was always used for what we called 'the pig's fry' - liver, heart and such like cut into bite sized pieces and made into a caul-wrapped parcel and distributed to neighbours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember the Pig killing here. It was always a big moment in the year. Now no-one keeps Pigs; or even Ducks and Hens for that matter. How things have changed over the past 45 years.

      Delete
  18. Ooh, they look divine! I love local rustic food. We have tripe sausages ie andouilles, which are so repulsive, our dog won't even eat one!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nor would I. There are very few things that I won't eat; Andouilles are certainly one.

      Delete
  19. Do I spy lips, spinal cords and penises? In the US, that's what they call bologna. I'm far too picky to eat that, but I am glad you loved it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just belly Pork, bread, and eggs, with some salt and pepper. All those other bits we export to the US to make Bologna.

      Delete
  20. I have faggots in my freezer.. these sound very similar mine being wrapped in caul fat too

    Jo in Auckland, NZ

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...