Sunday, 17 July 2016

Bluetooth.



What went through the minds of the boffins at the 'Signal' factory, when they invented this stuff: I cannot imagine.

There was no mention on the packet that it was dark blue, and that your mouth would end up filled with navy coloured foam. 

The very first time I used it, I was quite shocked and imagined there must have been some technical fault at the factory (maybe there was).

I persevered for a while; I had paid a couple of Euros for it after all. But I've now decided that dark blue is not for me, and I've reinvested in some good old 'Colgate' white stuff.

At least, I presume it's white.

p.s. I've just used it, it's pale-bloody-BLUE.



36 comments:

  1. The blue brings out the whiteness of the tooth enamel... rather like the blue rinse which older ladies hair is doused with at the salon.

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    Replies
    1. Maybe so, but looking in the mirror at a mouthful of blue foam is rather off-putting.

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    2. What a disturbing image you have painted, Cranky. I think of Cro as (visually) rather attractive. Are you trying to spoil it for me? Cro and blue rinsed teeth? Give me bleach any day. Mind you, on the funny side of it, Cro does occasionally foam at the mouth (mainly when it comes to politics). So from now on I shall imagine said foam as dark blue (pale won't make an impression).

      U

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  2. Well, Cro, if it's any consolation, toilet cleaners (the stuff you squirt around the bowl) tend to be blue too. I suppose blue denotes the pureness of deep waters. Think about it next time you go for a swim in your pool. Which reminds me: With the temperatures you have been enjoying recently is the water now lukewarm?

    U

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The pool water is around 28C; perfect.

      Blue certainly does have an aura of cleanliness about it, but I'd rather it was doing its work in the bog rather than in my mouth.

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    2. Paramedics' gloves are blue, as are Elastoplast in the catering industry.

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  3. Toilet cleaner blue toothpaste might be just the thing for me; I have a potty mouth occasionally.

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  4. His 'n her toothpaste, blue for boys pink for girls.

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    Replies
    1. Pink would make one imagine one had gum disease; wouldn't it?

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    2. Don't they make WHITE any more?

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  5. Remember dolly bags? They were to whiten the laundry. They were blue. Blue whitens. Don't ask me why.

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    Replies
    1. The Blue Whitener; I remember it.

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  6. My latest toothpaste is turquoise and dark blue stripes ! They've changed the formula again - last time it was a pale minty green, so not too bad. I don't think they do make white toothpaste any more, though I have some tooth whitener, which is, strangely, white !

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    Replies
    1. I think I'd prefer light minty green. Yup, I had some white whitener too; it didn't work.

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  7. Haha ..... your last line made me laugh !! I am late to the party this morning but I will just reiterate what everyone else has said that blue brings out the whiteness although, I've never seen pure navy blue toothpaste before. I think that there are still many white ones .... I use Pearldrops which is pure white .... no navy foam for me. I could imagine it would give your gums and lips a blue hue, making you look as if you have heart trouble !!! XXXX

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    Replies
    1. I think it was Pearldrops that I used to buy in England, over here I have bought the equivalent. My panic over toothpastes is mostly due to the fact that I can no longer find it anywhere.

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  8. Didn't " Signal" toothpaste have red, white and blue stripes?

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    Replies
    1. They were just trying to sell to France.

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  9. Can't understand why there's this total obsession with white teeth, it looks ridiculous, particularly against a carrot coloured suntan. Wish 'they'd' just leave everything alone, it's all working fine as it is ... and that includes Microsoft Windows!

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    Replies
    1. I have a friend who has whitened teeth; he looks ridiculous.

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  10. Yes, as Frances says, some are striped red white and blue - very patriotic!

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  11. My toothpaste is White, sainsbury's own brand for sensitive teeth, perhaps the cheaper brands can't afford to put blue in, a bit like cheap washing powder.

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    Replies
    1. Maybe I should just look for the cheapest one around.

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  12. Beetroot is red and does the same thing.

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    Replies
    1. Are you suggesting that I brush my teeth with Beetroot?

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  13. A few needed chuckles here and there this morning, but a more sobering thought: Was it manufactured in China? Kind of nasty but rather than use that suspicious navy blue stuff, I'd turn to baking soda.
    Note: My Colgate with "breath strips" is distributed by Colgate-Palmolive. Doesn't say where the green-gel toothpaste was manufactured, however.

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    Replies
    1. And we put this stuff in our mouths. Gawd knows what's in it.

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  14. There's a green toothpaste that stings your gums. I used to be partial to it but I haven't seen it over here, or anywhere lately for that matter. I think it's Euthymol, or maybe it's racing car fuel.

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    Replies
    1. I just looked it contains titanium something or other and glycerin and other strange things . . . no wonder I lost half my teeth.

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    2. I try to read the contents of almost everything I buy, but with toothpaste the chemical names probably wouldn't mean much to me anyway.

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  15. You sound like my husband. He has used the same white (Crest) toothpaste since he was a kid (long, long time ago). I have tried many and use blue. My teeth are whiter than his.

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