Monday, 25 April 2016

Unloved.


                           Résultat de recherche d'images pour "chained Labrador"

A few days ago we returned to find a recorded message on our land line phone.

The wife of a builder that we occasionally use, who has Labradors, wanted to know if we would take a 6 year old Lab' bitch who has been tied-up for the whole of her life (the picture is NOT of her).

Lady Magnon of course at once said 'let's have her', but being more practical I suggested that one dog was really enough.

I telephoned the lady and thanked her for thinking of us, and explained our situation. I also asked why the poor dog had been tied-up.

She said that the poor thing had been one of a litter from her own dog, and they had all found what she thought were good homes. She followed the progress of all the pups, and said that when she occasionally visited this particular one it was always attached. She was not pleased, and eventually demanded the dog back. She hoped we might take her.

It's a sad scenario, but many people in France treat their dogs this way. They have no idea how to look after animals, and think it enough just to feed and water them, then keep them tied to a kennel.

I don't know how much this poor dog will have been damaged by her lack of exercise and affection, but someone will no doubt have a lot of re-training to do. I would have liked it to be me, but it just wasn't possible.




53 comments:

  1. That's too bad. I hope she finds a good home, poor thing.

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    1. She deserves a few years of pampering.

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  2. When Doug got Sophie she was five years old and had spent her whole life on a small deck and was never taken for walks. She still rushes indoors if a fly lands on her as they must have plagued her.

    She is a lovely dog but it took a lot of patience.

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    1. She would be a great friend for Bok.

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    2. We're trying to simplify our lives a bit, we're very tied to 'home'.

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    3. Wouldn't she be part of "home"?

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  3. That is so sad. It is three years now, since we got Dobson. No clue to his past, other than his behaviour. He was terrified of traffic, of being outdoors, the dark, people.. vets. I have buckets of patience, thank goodness, as well as time. Those occasional times when I see sheer doggy happiness come through make the effort worth while. We have agreed that he is to be our last dog though, much as I adore him. I hope this dog finds someone to love her.

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    1. Our dog, Bok, is terrified of bangs, gunfire, and even thunder. I have a feeling that something nasty must have happened to him in his past.

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    2. Our Irish Setter was the same as Bok - I had to give him a sedative on those occasions.

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    3. I know we all assume bad things have happened to a rescue dog with fears, but I have one here who was bred carefully by us, born right here in our home, and raised by us with love and care. From two weeks she acted phobic around children, and she has always been a very nervy dog despite us doing our experienced best to socialise her. Some are just like that, just like people, and those sort of dogs are much more likely to end up in rescue because they are harder to manage and love (especially by half-arsed owners)than your average laid-back dog.

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  4. Aw, that's so sad. I find it quite difficult to accept the way the French treat their dogs, so many are tied up or in kennels all day.

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  5. How sad that you are not prepared to give her a chance Cro. Lady M obviously has a great deal more compassion than you do.
    You should know, from your time with Monty, that Labradors are the most affectionate of creatures, and respond extremely well to any affection shown to them.
    Sorry, but being "tied" to home is a very lame excuse.

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    1. That's easy for you to say; but we have a very small house, and frankly having had two big dogs was too much. We would also like to go travelling a bit, and having two dogs isn't easy; even one can be difficult.

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    2. Good on you Cro, for sticking to your guns, there are already far too many dogs, one is quite enough for anyone. You see people out these days with not just one dog but three or more, it seems to be a 'fashion' to go around with packs of dogs, the more the better, like a sort of status symbol. How the hell do they afford to keep them, with vets bills, food, kennelling when they go away etc?

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    3. I have to add, in case anyone's wondering, yes I am a dog lover and have had them in the past, but I choose not to have one now as I couldn't give it the time (and money!) it needs.

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    4. Have you ever thought that maybe these people actually love the dogs they have? At least some people are prepared to give an unloved dog a home. We have two, but it's nothing to do with being fashionable - they are company for one another.
      No doubt most responsible people factor in the cost of vets etc., before they first take a dog on - we certainly did. It's the ones who don't who are the ones that abandon them to the rescue centres, or worse, just tie them to a rubbish bin or throw them out of a moving car.

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    5. We are inundated with dogs here. Next door they have 3 that just roam about unattended (they recently ate my hens), another neighbour has 2, etc. No shortage here!

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  6. No, it's not easy for me to say. We, too, have a small house, little bigger than yours, and certainly nothing like the amount of land you have.
    Perhaps we just like dogs more than you do, so are prepared to take a chance.
    France seems to be quite dog friendly, and ours come with us on holiday when we go.



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    1. Well, I'm pleased to see that there is at least ONE person at large who is prepared to take any (or every) dog offered. Good for you.

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    2. Coppa's girl, maybe Magnon can give you the email of the lady who bred and placed the pup in the wrong house then bugged him to re-home the dog? Ultimately, she is responsible for giving him a good life. Maybe she should be convinced to take him?

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  7. I hope a kind soul comes along to give some loving care to that poor dog, Cro.
    My father in law had a sweet natured mongrel called Dana. The little dog had been taken away from a farmer because the poor thing had been tied to a chain for years and from pulling and tugging the chain had torn the flesh around the collar. The flesh then grew back on again and it grew over to cover the chain. My father in law called a vet to have the chain surgically removed and then took Dana home with him. Greetings Maria x

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    1. The things people do to their animals makes me sick, and they often claim to be 'animal lovers'.

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  8. My heart goes out to that poor dog. I had my first dog when he was 5. Apparently he had lived in a flat, and I suspect not been introduced to other dogs much as a puppy,as he was quite scared of other dogs that he didn't know. He was also very reluctant to be in our garden even if I was out there gardening, I would find him watching me from back in the house. He was adorable, very attached to me, and we gave a him a good life for 11 years.

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    1. Dogs seem to get phobias quite readily.

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  9. Poor thing...hope somebody gives it a loving home soon.
    Arilx

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  10. People buy horses in Spain and treat them like that. Horses! You sometimes see them tied to a post without shelter from the sun, in the middle of a dusty yard. They too are not just for Christmas!

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    1. They also throw Donkeys off mountains.

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  11. You can't just take an animal in without careful thought, can you Cro ? ..... it is sad but there are thousand's of sad cases and you could possibly be inundated with calls !! Chez Cro would end up as an animal shelter !! XXXX

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    1. I'd end up like John Gray (below), taking in every waif and stray.

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  12. Replies
    1. I know you would. I just wish she hadn't called, it's making me feel guilty already

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    2. Me too. I did lab rescue as a foster home for a bit. The last one didn't get placed and I kept him for 3 years until he died.

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    3. I've also fostered labs for lab rescue - could've kept them all but impossible!

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    4. I've also fostered labs for lab rescue - could've kept them all but impossible!

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  13. Replies
    1. And there are thousands more everywhere.

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  14. Oh dear Cro - now you must feel awful. So many dogs are treated so badly it is impossible to take them all. I'm sure she will find a loving home as she sounds a caring woman.

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    1. I'm sure she will, she has plenty of contacts.

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  15. Our neighbours in France are farmers. The seem to have a dog or two the treat as pets -- though I doubt they ever see a vet! Then they have others who are for hunting -- and those are outside -- always and inside a small area -- until the hunting season begins. They are quite pathetic and bark a lot -- sometimes all through a moonlight night...

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    1. Unfortunately there are so many of those hunting dogs around, that one has to stop worrying about them. One turned up here recently; it was as thin as a rake.

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    2. bloody foreigners.....

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  16. Years ago a neighbor adopted a beautiful Golden Retriever that was thrown out of a car in front of their house. That dog was a loving and calm pet, except when a certain make of a car drove by. It would bark incessantly and a few times broke away to chase them. She never forgot and did this for the rest of her life.

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    1. Dogs have long memories; they never forget.

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  17. I've just come inside from gardening, and Lady Magnon is surrounded by 7 dogs; only one of which is ours.

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  18. Good for you for knowing your limits; there will always be another sad case of a dog that needs help and one simply cannot save them all. I'm happy that we adopted a second dog but the extra time and expense is not insignificant. I had to unfollow the local shelters' Facebook pages because every sad case broke my heart, but no one can save them all much as we might wish to.

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    1. We'd love to give them ALL a home, but it just isn't possible.

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  19. I can't understand why people keep pets if they can't look after them properly. I'm not, I confess, a domestic pet person (although I dearly loved a cat I inherited) and my lifestyle certainly made keeping one impossible. So why would anyone keep one if they had no intention of loving it as a pet or using it as a working dog? I'm baffled.

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    1. Me too Graham. Some neighbours of mine once kept a Red Squirrel in a cage on the excuse that they were 'animal lovers'; my children went at night to release it. I only discovered this years later.

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  20. This is so sad. Bit I am sure she will find a home for the dog. As much as we all would love to help every dog we just can't.

    cheers, parsnip

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    1. I heard yesterday that she has now found a new home with a Dutch family. So all is well.

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    2. That is good news……so long as the Dutch are better with animals than the French !!

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