Thursday, 7 April 2016

Remarkable Taste or Chestnut Tourism.




Back in 1995, the combined French ministries of Environment, Culture, Tourism, and Agriculture, had the genius idea of establishing a list of 100 Sites Remarquables du Goût. 

These sites are nominated in order for them to promote their products and to encourage tourism, and I'm pleased to see that my neck-o-the-woods has now been honoured as part of the scheme, and has joined the ranks (above) in order to celebrate the humble Chestnut.

Chestnuts are big business hereabouts; I look out onto several new and old Chestnut plantations (one of which I used to own).

I'm not quite sure about the clumsy term 'Remarkable site of taste', but if it does some good for the local economy then who am I to criticise. 

So, if you're looking for a remarkably tasty Chestnut holiday site (whatever that is) for an upcoming break, then you know where to come.




24 comments:

  1. Sounds good but I would prefer your walnuts as a day by day food item.

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    Replies
    1. I agree, but Walnuts are treated as second class citizens here.

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    2. Absolutely. Walnuts are the best.

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    3. I continue to drink two teaspoons of oil, and eat at least eight Walnuts, every day. I hardly ever eat Chestnuts.

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  2. I love chestnuts and, as we have three weeks to tour France this August I'm thinking of trying to reach the Bordeaux region. I fear that we might be too early for the harvest though. x

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    1. September/October is Chestnut time, but you could always buy some preserved.

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    2. I hope you know the right sort of Chestnuts to choose. Yael managed to prevent me poisoning myself by eating Horse Chestnuts last year when visiting France ! I'll try again in September this year but I'll try to buy them at a market this time !

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  3. We also have a village on the outskirts of Verona calIed "Pian di Castagnè" (Chestnut Grounds), the village name says it all, and it has a yearly chestnut festival to introduce tourism. I love chestnuts; roasted, boiled and baked. I also make pappardelle with chestnut flour. But not good if you're watching your weight! Greetings Maria x

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    Replies
    1. France and Italy are the two biggest growers. I recently bought some flour, but didn't like it too much.

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  4. Lots of chestnut trees around here, and went foraging for the nuts a couple of year ago, only to be put off from doing so ever again by having to handle those prickly hard shells! I did manage to get some actual chestnuts out of those shells, but decided not to 'do' chestnuts ever again! I do love them roasted though, but think that buying from the supermarket already shelled is the way to go!

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    1. Those sound like wild Chestnuts, the ones here are mostly grafted and planted out in large plantations. The nuts drop from the husks when mature.

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    2. Vera. In the season, if you can find some 'Marsol' Chestnuts for sale, sow a few and plant them on the farm somewhere. They are a very good variety that grows from seed, unlike most that need to be grafted. They also fall well from their husks.

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  5. Chestnuts are one of my favourite foraging treats.
    Arilx

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    1. Plenty around here, Aril. Tons and tons.

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  6. It's odd how different countries have such differing tastes isn't it Cro? I can't think of ever eating chestnuts. Am I missing something?

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    1. We eat very few. It's always a novelty when they first drop, then a few at Christmas, and that's it.

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  7. We always used to have hot chestnuts from the man in Oxford Street but we don't have them much now .... maybe at Christmas .... brussels and chestnuts and chestnut stuffing. I actually prefer them raw.
    Your area of France is now on the map and famous !!!

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    Replies
    1. A few roasted around the Turkey, and some in the stuffing; delicious.

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  8. Replies
    1. It used to be the staple of the poor; that and Chestnut 'porridge'.

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  9. I use them sometimes during the winter holidays. It is an acquired taste and I can't get the younger generation to try them.

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    Replies
    1. I'm surprised. Try some roasted on them.

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  10. Of course Sites Remarquables du Goût sounds clumsy with a word-by-word translation, but perhaps a more colloquial version like Great Gastronomic Sites would sound better.

    I like chestnuts, but like Susan and Judith I much prefer walnuts. Second class citizens they are not.

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