Friday, 8 April 2016

Cro; Botanist.


If you're anything like me; when you hear the word 'Plantain', you probably think of large inedible green Bananas.

So, you can imagine my surprise, recently, when I asked my neighbour Claude about a certain plant that grows extensively in all local cow pastures. He informed me that it was called 'Plantain', and that the cattle love it. I believe it is also consumed by adventurous humans in salads, cooked as a vegetable, and in infusions.


Anyway; I digress. On a walk with Lady Magnon yesterday, I found the below; a lone variegated example in the middle of a field. I have never seen one before, and may never see one again.

                           

Presuming that this plant is new to science, I have named it Plantago Lanceolata Croii.



54 comments:

  1. Will we be reading soon about adventures on the good ship Beagle?

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  2. In the second photo it looks like an Hosta plant.
    https://www.google.ca/search?q=hosta+plant&biw=1366&bih=642&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj7u4Tqnf7LAhWltIMKHY1oD-oQ_AUIBigB

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    1. It does look at bit Hosta-like, but is quite small with the same flowers as its non-variegated cousin.

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    2. Variegated hostas are cultivated here. Not chez vous?

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  3. Were you not carrying your Keble Martin with you at the time?

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    Replies
    1. I only have an I-Spy book of wild flars.

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    2. I bet you never want to hear the word hosta ever again.

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    3. The Hosta theorists are just jealous.

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  4. Looks like a hosta to me! A good plant to grow under a shady tree.

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    1. It would have to be a very miniature Hosta. And Hostas don't have that type of flowers. I used to grow Hostas, but they were always eaten by slugs; I gave up.

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    2. Alright then. Not a hosta.

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  5. The leaves are wet. I told you it was raining!

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    Replies
    1. Some light frost this morning. Brrrrr.

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  6. Is the Plantago Lanceolata Croii edible? Greeting Maria x

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    Replies
    1. The ordinary green ones are, so why not?

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  7. It looks like a belated April Fool where some prankster has liberated a similar looking pot plant to fool you. x

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    1. Just the one in a huge field does look rather suspicious. I may dig it up and plant in a pot, to see if it continues to be variegated.

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  8. There is also a broad leafed plantain, perhaps this is one of those but with a genetic defect.

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    1. That sounds like the best idea yet.

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  9. Oh wow, a new plant species named after your good self!
    I am starting to investigate the benefits of wild herbs and we have lots of plantain growing here. Didn't know that the animals liked it though, so won't worry if we see it growing out on the pastures. Will let you know if we see the 'new' plant!

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    Replies
    1. Many of our local pastures have nothing but!

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  10. I also think it is a Hosta…or not a plantain anyway! I have a collection of small leaved Hostas…one of them is only about 2 inches tall. Those " flowers " could be coming from a plantain that is very close.

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    1. Studying the picture more closely, I am certain that the flowers are coming directly from the base.

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  11. Yes, it does look like a variegated hosta.

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    Replies
    1. You're all ganging-up on me. It's a Plantain.

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  12. I remember the plantain from our walks in the fields growing up in Surrey!!!

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    Replies
    1. I don't remember them in the UK at all.

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  13. Replies
    1. Good for you, Graham, they're all jealous of my new discovery!

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  14. Could it be the hosta called plantain lily.
    https://www.gardenia.net/plant/hosta-First%20Mate-plantain-lily

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    Replies
    1. It says leaves are 24 inches long; this one was about 4 inches. But it does seem to combine both camps.

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    2. Sounds as though it needs a bit o' vurtilizer !

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  15. Imagine you discovering this rare plant. I also thought Plantain is that green banana shaped vegetable eating in Africa. I learnt something new from you today. Have a great weekend. Jo

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    Replies
    1. I don't guarantee that I'm right!

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  16. That's definitely a hosta. We have lots. Oh, and the plantain is fun if you pick one, wind the stem round just under the head, and flick it. I do this with my grandchildren. it's a kind of harmless (very harmless) weapon.

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    1. But Hostas don't have Plantain-like flowers. I used to grow Hostas and they were always much bigger with actual flowers. This thing has 'buds' on the end of long stalks.

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  17. No idea. If you like it and want it in your garden - Snaffle it!

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  18. Hostas are ubiquitous. Even my beloved August lily is a hosta. Some grow only in shade. Some in full sun. Suspicious little plant, looking to take over the universe.

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    Replies
    1. It's not doing a very good job so far.... something of a loner.

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  19. It's kind of funny that nobody is taking your word for it. I think it is just because the size of the photo of the variegated plantain is bigger than the size of the others. If it has the same shaped leaves, flowers, and growth pattern as the plantains (and is the same size) then it is likely the same thing.

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    1. It is the same, just the colouring that's different. It's a shame that there were no plain Plantains next to it to compare.

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  20. Oh yes we used to use plantains as 'weapons' as Frances suggests when we were kids.
    As to that hosta. Who are you trying to hoodwink Cro?

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    Replies
    1. I was still trying to work out exactly what she meant about winding the stem etc.

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  21. Not that I want to burst your bubble, Cro, but have you tried googling "variegated plantain"? You are still a wonderfully interesting and industrious person, just maybe not the first to set eyes on this plant. Sorry.

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    1. OK, just had a look, and you're right. There was one example that was exactly the same as mine (but with slightly less variegation), and was DEFINITELY a Plantain. Maybe I can no longer claim it as a new discovery, but at least I was right, and all those claiming that it's a Hosta are wrong.

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  22. Oh dear, I was going to ask, in the event of Cro discovering a new and rare plant, if perhaps Lady M would share the glory, as she was there at the time !

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    Replies
    1. Are you trying to start a war? I've told her nothing about the naming!

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  23. Queen Charlotte had the Strelitzia named after her, so you are in good company. Keep up the good work! (One does like to travel in certain circles.)

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  24. As for genuine plantain, we called it "grasshopper weed" when I was a kid. I learned, as an adult thanks to my wife who's always brewing some strange concoction, that it is a versatile herb with lots of uses. She makes salves out of it. It is edible too of course. We've had it as a pizza topping and in salads.

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    Replies
    1. You're the first person I've encountered who actually claims to have eaten it. I must try some today.

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  25. Any of the Hosta conspiracy theory folk (above), may like to have a look at the following. http://blog.arrowheadalpines.com/2010/05/variegated-weeds.html

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