Monday, 14 December 2015

Product Test. Bottled Cèpes.



In October 2014 we had a wonderful crop of Cèpes, many of which I bottled (top shelf).

This was the first time I'd bottled them in water rather than oil, and I was recently reminded that I'd promised to let you know how they stood up.

We use them mostly for omelets, and occasionally Poulet aux Cèpes, and frankly I wouldn't have known the difference between the two alternative water/oil methods. Once well fried and 'omeleted', they taste exactly the same.


Of course, they'll never replace freshly picked mushrooms, but fresh Cèpes are hard to find in mid-Winter.

Anyone interested in my mushroom bottling method (I imagine it would work for other 'substantial' mushrooms), will find it by writing Oh Yes!!!!! into the search strip (top left) of my page; you might need to scroll down a bit.

28 comments:

  1. They look wonderful all lined up on your pantry shelf, well done Cro

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    1. There's a few less today; too tempting.

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  2. Bottled mushrooms...now that's a good idea! I usually dehydrate mine, but have to allow for them to rehydrate again, so getting them straight out of a jar would be quicker.

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    1. Do Cepes grow where you are? If so it's a good method of preserving. We also dry a few each year, but I only use them for risottos.

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    2. They probably do, but I would have to do a lot of research before I picked and ate any!

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  3. Cepes, one thing more to add to my must have list if i shall start travelling again.

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    1. You'll mostly find them in France and Italy, although they do grow almost everywhere.

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  4. I am sure that omelet is/was delicious.

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  5. 'Hard to find in Winter...' Grrr...

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  6. I can practically smell that omelet ... how fabulous to have access to them through those cold days.

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    1. Cepe omelets smell (and taste) wonderful.

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  7. That omelet looks mighty good. You are tempting me to cook my breakfast rather than opening up a container of yogurt.

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  8. The line up of preserved cepes jars is quite impressive. The omelet looks mighty tasty. (I've just eaten a boiled egg and buttered toast and coffee for my breakfast. Yes, that combo tasted good, but now I've got plans for an omelet in the near future, even if no handpicked cepes will be part of the mix.)

    As always, best wishes.

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    1. I haven't eaten a boiled egg for breakfast for ages, it's about time I did!

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  9. It looks as though you have a well stocked winter store, Cro.

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    1. I try to make provision until the next load of crops turn up. Not always successfully.

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  10. I love your store shelves - looks as though you could withstand a siege Cro.
    Every time you put up a picture of your lunch I am drooling. Wish you hired our your services as a cook.

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    1. I do my best Weave. Yup, the store cupboard is still well stocked.

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  11. Living in France and in New Zealand have a certain similarity in relation to eating in season. Apart from water melons I find it hard to determine any seasonality in our supermarkets which, I regret to say, provide much of my food.

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    1. Yes, our shops are still very seasonal here; everything has its moments.

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  12. I make pickled red cabbage now ready to eat with Christmas cold meats. I do wet brine cauliflower and other vegetables, whatever might be around. All my favourites. I do not do cepes.

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    1. I've just done my red cabbage; did my onions last week.

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