Thursday, 19 November 2015

Sauerkraut.

                       


I'm particularly enjoying my seasonalal doses of Choucroute (sauerkraut) this year. In previous years I've become rather tired of it after just a couple of meals; this year not so.

There are two types of Choucroute sold here in Autumn/Winter, raw and cooked; big piles of both are now found at all supermarket deli counters. I always buy the cooked which is slightly more expensive but tastier. The 600gms above cost a mere quid.

Traditional accompaniments range from smoked sausages, to cooked ham; always Pork based preserved meats. I usually add knackis, thick cut bacon, smoked sausage and sausisse de morteau, etc, as well as a few small boiled potatoes.

The Choucroute itself is simply re-heated in white wine.



So much for not eating too many smoked Pork products! Delicious.



50 comments:

  1. I was raised on sauerkraut, plus other things as well. Amanda hates it, and both daughters love it as well, so she holds us all at arms left when we have a feast.

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    1. It does seem to cause controversy. I was only introduced to it when I moved here over 40 years ago, it didn't exist in the UK when I was younger. I'm a big fan; especially this year, for some reason.

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  2. I like the fork the knife and the plate. We also ate a lot of sauerkraut when i was a child because of my german grandmother.

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    1. My Swedish/Russian daughter in law (Kellogg) said she will make some Sauerkraut for me..... apparently it's very simple.

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  3. I have never tried sauerkraut, but maybe one day.......

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    1. Surely it's everywhere down where you are. Go for the 'cuite', re heat in white wine, and serve with naughty smoked porky things. Lovely.

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  4. We can buy it bottled here, though it's not something I've ever bought. I have tried it when dished up by German friends, but can't say I particularly enjoyed it. Definitely something that comes under the heading of an acquired taste, I think.

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    1. I would never buy the bottled stuff, it's just not the same. Luckily we have plenty of fresh on sale.

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  5. Had sauerkraut in Austria many years ago - delicious!

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    1. My dad used to say that. I didn't like sauerkraut when I was young, but I like it a lot now.

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  6. I don't think I have ever tried sauerkraut , but those various smoked sausages look delicious!

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    1. Not sure where you'd get in in Herts, but there must be a German deli around somewhere.

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    2. I expect Waitrose would have it in tins or jars!

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    3. Waitrose sell it in jars.

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    4. For your Info Herta is an affiliate of Nestlé Switzerland.No need to find a German deli.

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  7. We always made our own when I was growing up. Favourite way of eating it was cooked with pork ribs in a pressure cooker; added onion, a few small red potatoes, a bay leaf, caraway seed, garlic and freshly ground pepper.
    40 minutes later, a meal fit for a king.

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    Replies
    1. That sounds really good; I'm not as adventurous.

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  8. That plate looks just my sort of meal Cro.

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    1. I can assure you that it was delicious.

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  9. Yum! And, it's also the season for raclette - all that melted cheese on spuds and sausage. Never lose weight at this rate.

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    1. It's hard not to put-on a few pound over winter; raclette is another good reason NOT to diet.

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    2. We've had raclette in Switzerland, with baby potatoes, baby pickled cucumbers and small white onions. A wonderful meal and fascinating to watch the traditional method - the chef melting the cheese wheel over a wood fire and scraping it off onto our plates.
      We can buy the raclette cheese here but it comes pre-packed and in small slices - not the same thing at all !

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  10. My parents used to make our own. The fermentation making blub blub noises. I made it once when living in France and had my own harvest of cabbage.
    Hopefully in the not so far away future I can do so again.
    I prefer it when it's not cooked for too long and still has a bit of crunch to it.
    Salivating now.

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    1. The one above is quite soft, it's the only way I've ever had it. My daughter in law is going to make some, so I'll be able to see the difference.

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  11. I love saurkraut, especially with kielbasa sausage. My mom would tell you it's the Polish side of me (from my dad) coming out. She hates it. Which is fine--more for us! :)

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    1. The Kielbasa that I know is very similar to the dark smoked sausage in my picture. Perfect with Sauerkraut.

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  12. My parents used to make sauerkraut each year and then put it up in glass jars alongside their jams, jellies, and stewed tomatoes to use for the rest of the year. It was so good, and the color provided a nice contrast to the vibrant colors of the other homemade canned food in glass jars in the pantry. I wonder how hard it is to make? Maybe you should post your daughter-in-law's recipe?

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    1. I do a piece about it when she starts.

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  13. I can take or leave sauerkraut and I can take or leave hot dogs and sausages but put them together and yum yum.

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  14. The fermentation makes it very healthy for the gut. Raclette? It all sounds good, even in this early morning.

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    1. Yes, I believe it's health properties are on a par with yoghurt.

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  15. I use a quarter inch of water in the pan...
    put egg[s] in, lid part on and bring to boil...
    lid on, turn to simmer and time three minutes.
    Meanwhile, make toast...
    Remove egg[s] and place in eggcup[s]...
    butter toast and cut into fingers...
    remove top of egg with your 'rusty sabre...
    sit down and eat!
    If you haven't got a trusty sabre...
    one of those circular scissor gizmos with the teef all round the edge works fine!

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    1. You're a day late with this advice, but I'll forgive you. As for an egg broaching tool, I go for the edge of a teaspoon every time, although the sabre works very well on my champagne corks.

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    2. Sorry, that was yesterdays post... I'm a bit behind...
      I love sauerkraut... made some once with a white cabbage and a Chinese hatchet...
      fermented it out in the garage...
      the top crust looked horrible...
      but once removed and discarded, the rest was vunderbar...
      the recipe didn't give any instructions on preparation... save rinse well and boil.
      Tasted OK tho'... but t'wife doesn't like it...
      which means I can only get it if a restaurant is serving it!!
      The French way...duck fat and wine...
      is far more tasty than just plain boiled!!

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  16. I do like sauerkraut in small doses. Someone once told me that a co-worker ate it, and pickles, all day at their desk.

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    1. That sounds a wee bit obsessive, but I can understand it.

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  17. Herta beurk real industrial food no porc only fat sugar and other trash ingredients, OMG.
    Bon appétit pour un repas vraiment pas gourmet !!

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    1. Read the pack '100% pur porc'.

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    2. You trust food industry? In fish fingers there is no fish only "fish waste" which you would normally throw away when you prepare your fresh fish or maybe use for a fish soup..It's the same for" Herta saucisses".

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    3. You trust food industry? In fish fingers there is no fish only "fish waste" which you would normally throw away when you prepare your fresh fish or maybe use for a fish soup..It's the same for" Herta saucisses".

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  18. Being German, I looooove Sauerkraut. I have not been back to Germany in a couple of years, and seeing Herta's Knacki made me both laugh and envy you for that plate of deliciousness!

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    1. I must admit that it's the only time I eat them, they seem obligatory.

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  19. I love sauerkraut, I prefer the raw version for the crunch factor. With some rye sourdough and good cheese it makes a great sandwich. Every now and then I try to make my own but it can be a bit hit and miss...easier to buy it.

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    1. Maybe I'll try the raw, I like the idea of having it in a sandwich with cheese.

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  20. Love sauerkraut, especially with pork.
    I was raised Polish so I love anything pickled. I miss my Mum's pork roast cooked with sauerkraut.
    Wondeful.

    cheers, parsnip

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    1. Forgot to add I adore Korean Kimchi.

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    2. I've never had Kimchi, but just yesterday I was looking at recipes. It seems that it covers a very wide range of ingredients, flavours, etc.

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    3. I eat kimchi mixed with sticky white rice. It is very good. Don't know how they eat it in South Korea, but that's how I eat it in Oklahoma.

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