Sunday, 18 October 2015

Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah.


I love this song, it brings back great memories; it also happens to reflect how I feel on most mornings!



It should be noted that James Baskett (above) who sings this song was banned from attending the 1946 premier of the film 'Song of the South' (from which it comes) because of racial segregation.

How absolutely disgraceful; unimaginable on this side of the pond.



35 comments:

  1. I love this song, too.

    We have a shameful history of segregation here in the South, and we're still facing the consequences of it to this day.

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    1. It's the fact that it was so institutionalised that I find so shocking; like in South Africa.

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  2. Comment dit-on si bien dans la Chöre France : je ne suis pas raciste, mais.........eh oui le racisme n'est pas une opinion mais un crime ! Bon dimanche Sir !

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  3. Chère France ah ce clavier allemand

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  4. There's still some unacceptable things that go on there now like the number of obviously psychotic people in significant distress who wander the streets untreated. It's a much rarer sight in Europe.

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    1. I think their Cops need sorting out too.

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  5. I never feel that cheerful in a morning.

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    1. I'm very fortunate, I always wake feeling happy.

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  6. Many of us here, on this side of the pond, wonder how the US can claim to be a free and equal society. They are constantly claiming Human Rights as an excuse to interfere throughout the world. Yet their own record, in their own country amongst their own people, is disgraceful.

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  7. Cro - segregation of any kind is a criminal act - we are all the same and should be treated as such.
    As to the zip bit - I sometimes manage the zip by the time I get out of bed but the rest of it takes a little longer to kick in these days. The farmer is always up and raring to go though.

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    1. I am always up first, singing and raring to go.

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  8. That was almost 70 years ago and times have changed, Today, we have a black President. Hate and discrimination will always be with us and is not exclusive to the US. Small minded people live everywhere.

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    1. It seems to me that your Cops are going around as if it's still 70 years ago. Not much other news comes to us from the US.

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    2. Sensational news always gets the most press. Most policemen are good folks, most people are good neighbors. In a country that is so vast and so diverse, we have our problems, but the majority of Americans are generous, kind, and caring people who try to live the best lives they can.

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    3. Of course. Bad news always gets priority!

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    4. She's quite right about the majority of Americans being generous, kind, and caring and the majority of policemen being good folks. And of course sensational news gets the most press.

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    5. Do you suggest that killIng brutally Afro-Americans are sensationell news? Cops in the US are not really known to be angels.

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    6. Do you suggest that killIng brutally Afro-Americans are sensationell news? Cops in the US are not really known to be angels.

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    7. We are trying to right the wrongs that have been committed by individuals with hardened hearts. Hopefully, with this being in the news, things will change. We can't do anything about yesterday, but we can do something about tomorrow. No society is perfect, but the majority of us want to do what is right. There are thousands of policemen in the US, and a minority act despicably, the rest put their lives on the line to protect and help us.

      I love my country, warts and all, and I assume that you, mia more, feel the same about your home.

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    8. I'm not especially proud about my country Germany where neo nazis and unchained racists protest against refugees and I have no patriotic feelings.We do not choose our birth place, so home is where the heart is!

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  9. A country were death penality exists , is not a real democracy. Sorry.

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  10. You are very chirpy this morning. I couldn't bring myself to listen to it, but I still have it running through my head. Thanks.

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    1. It's a really foul day here; the only thing to do is whistle.

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    2. Sunny and 25ºC again today, Cro. Storms forecast in the next few days though, so we guess your weather is heading our way.

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  11. A great song indeed. Sad about history.

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  12. I live in a working class neighborhood in Central Florida - just under the immense geographic region commonly referred to in the U.S. as The Deep South (aka The Bible Belt). Within a 5 block radius we have families who are African American, families who are Hispanic, families who are white, and at least 3 Cops in the bunch. So far, nobody has been shot or beaten for being different. People seem pretty friendly. Let's hope for the best.

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    1. My tiny 240 resident village contains people of various nationalities, including some black people (African French), we have no Cops, and people are extremely friendly.

      Did you enjoy the song?

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    2. Yes, I sure did. I was saddened to hear that James Baskett was not allowed to attend the premier, but I was not surprised. The 1946 premier was in Atlanta, Georgia, which was a racially segregated city back at that time. The entire Deep South was pretty hateful back then. Now Atlanta is the 4th largest black majority city in the U.S. and is a vibrant center of African-American culture. The Civil Rights Movement in the early 1960's was a pretty glorious effort. Time has a funny way of righting some of the wrongs.

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    3. And yes, it is absolutely shocking to realize that racism was institutionalized and acceptable in the U.S. Horrifying and shameful.

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  13. I saw this in the movies, and now have the song playing in my head. I never understood racial segregation, it was not the norm where I grew up, although I moved to an area where it had been the norm and lived there two years. Hated living there and was never so glad to leave a place in my life. Even though segregation had ended legally over a decade before, the mores and customs surrounding it had not.

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