Tuesday, 22 September 2015

Harvest time.



Far fewer Butternuts than usual this year, I think we have just 12.

To make up for this poor harvest we have three big pumpkins (the one above is the smallest), and quite a good crop of these delicious Delicata Squash (below); again about a dozen.


I really do recommend these small but tasty Squash. If you know someone who grows them; ask for a few seeds.


Otherwise, I'm not quite sure what happened, but we have very few winter 'greens' this year. Most of my sowings failed, and frankly I was too busy with our building project to do much about it. I have just 2 Swiss Chard plants, a few Kale plants, and some Calabrese.

All other stuff is now indoors. Plenty of red onions, a few marrows, apples, pears, tomatoes (whilst they last), as well as all our preserves.

It'll be a strange winter having to BUY Sprouts, and Leeks, etc. A lesson to be learned for next year, when I should have a lot more time on my hands. 

Also for 2016, I'm entering into the realms of 'Raised Beds'; I have a feeling it'll make life easier.



24 comments:

  1. But how will you get a rotavator through a raised bed?

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    Replies
    1. I'm going to make a small 'entrance'.... it's all planned.

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  2. I buy everything that i eat, and so sorry for it.

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    Replies
    1. I only buy meat, cheese, wine, and household things.

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  3. I can only think of one thing when I look at that pumpkin and it's rude.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I thought about that too. Wicked!

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  4. Lucky you, with home grown vegetables!

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  5. You'll love having raised beds, Cro. They make my life so much easier. I have five large ones and two small. Mine are very Australian looking, being made from colour-bonded corrugated steel. The soil stays lovely and loose (I did buy it in) so no need for heavy digging and weeding is a breeze.

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    Replies
    1. I think mine will be more 'compartmentalised' than 'raised'. A smaller boarded area, but used more efficiently.

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  6. I had good sized vegetable gardens when I was younger but now we have raised beds. They are so much easier!

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  7. Agree about raised beds Cro - I think (hope) the farmer is coming round to my way of thinking.
    Thos squash look tremdous - I love them but we are just too far North.
    There is no telling why some crops fail. Up until last year Leeks were one of our most successful crops - but last year and again this year they have rapidly gone to seed. They are alright for leek and potato soup, which I am making every week, but not for much else.

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    Replies
    1. Soup is the only reason I grow/buy Leeks. The best.

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  8. We have failed with winter greens this year, just nine brussel plants, six Russian kale and a dozen winter savoy. We usually have rows of Kurly and Black kale and purple sprouting Brocolli. I can't remember how we ended up this way!
    Oh yes and our leeks are pathetic.

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    Replies
    1. Sounds like here, all my Black kale (cavolo nero) failed.... no idea why. This'll be the first year for ages without any. Woe is me!

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  9. Well you can certainly be proud of the veg. in the photos. They look perfect. I suppose "bad" years are occasionally inevitable, and the downside of growing any fruit or veg.

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    Replies
    1. Those 'bad' years are usually my own fault.

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  10. Oh I am so envious. I really want to let the man out in a garden bigger than our Amsterdam canal balcony to see what he coulc produce for us. Miserable harvest this year, really only chilies and herbs.

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    Replies
    1. Your Amsterdam canal balcony sounds wonderful, but, yes, probably a bit limited for growing too much.

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    2. It is lovely, I am bragging (but I like a bit more muck for the man to do his potato and pumpkin in)

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  11. The slugs have been at my kale again, so I've had only two leaves to eat. I can see why the slugs visited, the little bit I had was quite tasty. Can't you sow some seeds now for the greens? I imagine you don't get a hard frost much before November, and that'd give the kale enough time to grow a bit.

    I wish my elderly neighbor who has since moved south closer to his son were still here with his chickens and ducks. they kept the slugs in check.

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    Replies
    1. You've just reminded me; I'd better put some slug pellets down (wildlife friendly, of course).

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