Wednesday, 12 August 2015

The morning walk.



It's about 7am, and the sun's not yet properly up. I've finished all my computer work (blog, emails, notifications, and other laptop stuff), and it's time to take Bok for his early morning emptying.

Having put 4 Bonio biscuits into my pocket, we head-off down past Jean-Claude's maize field where we recently had a slightly worrying encounter with a big male wild boar.


Along past the bit of woodland (and its crumbling old pigsty) that I've been trying to buy for the past few years. A bit of woodland is the one thing we still need, and this hectare or so is filled with enough dead chestnut to keep us all going, without ever having to fell a single living tree.


Then on past my friend Laurence's sunflowers that are almost ready for harvesting. Her work is all done, and from now on it's the people for whom she grows the crop, who take total control over all the actual combining etc.


And on past my oak that waiting to be delivered (not all of it). I think I ordered 8 cu metres; half for me; half for Wills.


Then home again, where I grab a couple of peaches and some figs for my breakfast.

It's still not yet 8am, and both me and Bok are ready to face the world.



24 comments:

  1. Looks and sounds good - great stack of oak and those peaches look delicious.

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  2. You had a wonderful walk in the morning. You have seen many things on your way. Have a good time!

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  3. 9 o'clock here i have to go to the hairdresser.

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    1. I've been out too. Hope it went well.

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  4. It is a lovely morning here and I should be out walking instead of being at the computer. I would love to take your morning walk with you there is so much to see of interest. That is a magnificent stack of wood enough to keep us all going over winter. Enjoy your breakfast.

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    1. It's hot and steamy again here. No need for wood just yet.

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  5. What a pleasant discourse first thing in the morning.

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    1. It was such a contrast to what my description of my early morning would have been.

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  6. What a lovely walk…..but it is rather "rubbing it in " for me as I can't walk my dog at all due to a very poorly knee! I used to leap( that might be an exaggeration ) out of bed, looking forward to going out right after breakfast. I now have to watch P going off down the drive with Alexi for the lovely walk.

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    1. Sorry about your knee Frances. You must find that VERY frustrating.

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  7. I can see why you moved there all those years ago Cro.
    Even though I live in the Hertfordshire suburbs of London, we are lucky enough to have the Great Woods on our doorstep and some pretty good countryside up the road but can also can get into London in 20 minutes.
    ….. oh to pick a peach from a tree. It is possible here as my friend has a peach tree and I've tasted their delights but they are not quite so easy to grow here.
    Hope that you try the succulent in an urn idea. XXXX

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    1. A near neighbour has a Peach tree that is so laden, the branches are breaking. I may have to help lighten the load (she's absent).

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  8. It all sounds so idyllic Cro.
    On the subject of what we round here call 'haylage'. Quite often what we try to make as hay turns out as haylage when the weather turns too soon. Second crop silage we make (we sell our first crop as we have no animals of our own, only stock belonging to others)
    and we sell it as standing grass. But the farmer always likes to make 'a bit of hay' - for old times sake and also because the sheep we overwinter much prefer hay to silage if the weather turns bad. The silage we make just about lasts the cattle we overwinter in the loose housing. If it runs out then their owner (our friend and neighbour) just brings some over.

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  9. I forgot to say that the farmer does quite a bit of haymaking for others and it is always for folk with horses.

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    1. I think that 'haylage' making is universal these days. I used to love taking in the old rectangular bales.... proper hay-making.

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  10. What a great start to the morning! Love your photos!

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    1. Welcome Wendy. I try to take a different walk every day, but there's a limit. This one (above) is just by the house.

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  11. It reminds me so much of growing up on the family farm I was very much the wild child; spending my summers camped out along the creek which bordered it. Helping my grandfather around the farm... fruit from the various bushes and trees around, etc...

    Thank you for the reminder.

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  12. Good morning from another Frances. I found your site via your comments over at Weaver's place.

    It's a true pleasure to see your posts and get a bit of understanding of another country life. Here in the city, my early morning rise has allowed me to get laundry done the the apartment building's basement. Not too idyllic, but very convenient.

    Now, I can set out for a fabulous farmers market downtown at Union Square. I'm sure to bring home perfectly ripe tomatoes and peaches, and other veg.

    Best wishes.

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    1. Central NY, and here, could hardly be more different, but we both have the 'web' and that allows us to reach out over the big pond. An 'old boy' from my school was the first Mayor of your city (Capt Willett ?), so I feel connected.

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  13. I live three hours north of San Francisco, Mendocino County. Normally idyllic, heaven on earth...but in this our fourth year of drought, we seem to be surrounded by terrible fires. Half hour-45 minutes away in Lake County it was the Rocky fire (65,000 acres). No sooner did they get that one doused when another started. 12,500 acres and growing. Our exhausted firefighters are heroes.
    P.S. Please keep a watchful eye and ear for that wild boar.

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    1. Over here we've been watching your problems with particular interest. We have several friends who live out your way, and we are always worried when 'fire season' starts up again. One friend has even decided to head for Europe until things calm.

      Stay safe; as we intend to do with the Boar.

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