Wednesday, 29 July 2015

Etymology Corner.


                                   The entry of Russian troops in Paris

When on March 31st 1814 the Russians entered Paris, they quite naturally needed to eat-n-drink (fighting the French had been a hungry/thirsty business).

So, after ensuring that the white flags were correctly fluttering, the ravenous Cossacks went in search of anywhere that sold food; apparently shouting the word 'Bistro'. As they were still 'on duty' they didn't want to hang about waiting.

'Bistro' (быстро in Russian) means 'Fast'.... and so fast-food was born. The small eateries that provided the food became known as 'Bistros'.

Amazing the things you learn when you have Russians in the family.


16 comments:

  1. You learn something every day.

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  2. Well, well, well - who knew!

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  3. Interesting. I hope you didn't just make that up.

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    Replies
    1. No, but I might well make up the etymology of Bisto.

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    2. I don't believe any of this.

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    3. Go and do your warm Yoga.

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  4. I never knew that. I shall amaze/bore all my friends with this new knowledge!

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  5. I'm sure I'll have a new jacket soon, since I'll be unable to resist the urge to shout out 'Bistro!' at random moments.

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  6. The next time we eat in a bistro I shall amaze and impress my friends with that!

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    Replies
    1. I prefer 'impress', rather than Frances's 'bore'.

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  7. I always thought that it meant a loud place to eat.

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    Replies
    1. As in 'filled with scruffy students'?

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  8. Well, we never knew that ! But then we don't have any Russians in the family - thank goodness you do Cro !

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  9. And, now, I, too, have learned something new today.

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  10. afascinating piece of information which is always good to drop into a pregnant pause at a party!

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